Milo (Finding Home #2)

Milo (Finding Home #2) by Lily Morton: Review by Lost in a Book for @BMBR

Milo (Finding Home #2)

Blurb:

Once upon a time a brave knight rescued a young man. Unfortunately, he then spent the next few years bossing the young man around and treating him like a child.

Milo has been burying himself at Chi an Mor, hiding from the wreckage of his once promising career and running from a bad relationship that destroyed what little confidence he had. Niall, his big brother’s best friend, has been there for him that entire time. An arrogant and funny man, Niall couldn’t be any more different from the shy and occasionally stuttering Milo, which has never stopped Milo from crushing wildly on the man who saved him.

However, just as Milo makes the decision to move on from his hopeless crush, he and Niall are thrown into close contact, and for the first time ever Niall seems to be returning his interest. But it can never work. How can it when Milo always needs rescuing?

From the bestselling author of the Mixed Messages series comes a story about a man who needs to write his own happily ever after.

This is the second book in the Finding Home series, but it can be read as a standalone.

Content warning: There are descriptions of domestic abuse in this book.

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3.5 Stars

Chi an Mor

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In Milo, we are back at Chi an Mor where Oz and Silas fell in love (In the book #1, Oz) and at the end of that book I was impatiently waiting for Milo’s story so I could dwell in the land of witty banter between Milo and Niall forever and ever. And I did, at least for the first half.

Milo starts out with a big trigger warning for domestic abuse. Milo is at such a low point during the opening scene and is thankfully saved by Niall who goes all beast mode on the fucker of an ex while wrapping Milo in a blanket of protection. Milo is carried off to Chi an Mor, an estate in the wilds of Cornwall to heal, find his inner strength again, and realize the sassy spitfire he used to be is still there.

Niall, the frustratingly arrogant yet kind soul that he is, slowly brings Milo back to life. He doesn’t fix him but gently forces Milo to realize his own self worth along the way and is always Milo’s biggest supporter. Niall has been in Milo’s life since they were teenagers and Niall was best friends with Milo’s brother. They have a sweet friendship because of the long history and there’s also a sassy wit and/or low grade exasperation between them that begins to serve as foreplay. They are soooooo sweet together but not in the everything is so perfect and lovey dovey boring without snark kind of way. I’m talking the good kind where each man is supportive, brings their own personalities and quirks to the relationship, and can still have fantastically entertaining exchanges as each make their points.

“Well, Milo,” he says mock seriously. “My milkshake might bring all the boys to my yard, but I’m afraid you’re not getting a drink yet because I value my body too much to give it away for free.”

Milo starts out very strong and entertaining. However, IMO, as the story unfolds, too much is added in. It seems like the overall plot gets lost about midway through and it never quite gets back on track as drama continues to randomly pop up. Some of it seems like filler and another element becomes *really* off-putting. I understand that Milo’s brother is going to end up playing a part in this story, but the direction it goes would have been fine if there weren’t constant references to the part he played.

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Still, I LOVE Niall and Milo separately and together. They are hot during their smexy times and are really lovely to experience as their own story. I have also maintained my giant crush on Oz and Silas and I’m *so* happy they have an active part in this story. Recommended.

“A real man? Can you hear that? What is a real man, Milo? I’ll tell you what a real man is. He’s someone kind and generous and loving. Someone who has had his spirit crushed yet gets back up and carries on making ugly things beautiful.”

Copy provided for honest review.

 

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